submit abstract #Arthroplasty 2018

Joint replacement surgery carries the risk of developing an infection in the replaced joint, which can lead to a so-called revision or re-do of the joint replacement. However, current diagnostic practices can fail to detect bacteria in 30-50 percent of clinical cases, complicating or delaying appropriate treatment. Thomas Jefferson University researchers have found that genomic analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS), can identify infecting organisms in over 80 percent of cases of infected joint replacement that had previously escaped detection.

_Next generation genomic sequencing can help detect pathogens after joint replacement_

This method can help detect pathogens that we would otherwise miss using standard approaches, namely culture,” said senior author Javad Parvizi, MD, Vice Chairman of Research and Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at the Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University. “The study has revealed unexpected pathogens and let us to select more appropriate and effective treatments for patients.”

Because of its promising role in diagnosing patients with periprosthetic joint infection, we have already begun to use the genomic test at our institution to isolate organisms in patients with suspected joint infection. NGS has provided critical information for the management of cases of periprosthetic joint infection at our institution, and we work closely with our microbiology colleagues to optimize treatment for these patients” said Dr. Parvizi.

Know more by heading towards https://arthroplasty.cmesociety.com/call-for-abstracts

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